Fair Use Week at the Yale Library

February 15, 2017

From February 20-24, Yale University Library will be hosting a series of events to mark Fair Use Week – an annual celebration held the last week of February celebrating the important doctrines of Fair Use in the United States. Members of the Yale community are welcome to join us for any or all of these events.


Fair Use Week Popup Table, Medical Library


Monday, February 20, 1:00-3:00 pm, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library


Drop by to learn about Fair Use (*see below) and how you can analyze the four factors of Fair Use in your own work. Librarians will provide a helpful handout and candy!



Fair Use in the Arts Panel Discussion


Monday, February 20, 5:00 pm, Digital Media Center for the Arts, 149 York


Join us for a discussion on Fair Use in the visual arts centered around communities of artistic practice, by Johannes DeYoung, Justin Berry and Matthew Leifheit. We’ll explore different ways artists, designers, and makers invoke Fair Use in their work, particularly as it applies to the visual arts. Panelists will offer their perspectives and experiences navigating copyright restrictions and how Fair Use helps guide and protect artistic practice.

Fair Use Week Popup Table, Sterling Memorial Library


Tuesday, February 21, 1:00-3:00 pm, Sterling Memorial Library Nave


Drop by to learn about Fair Use (*see below) and how you can analyze the four factors of Fair Use in your own work. Librarians will provide a helpful handout and candy!

Fair Use Week Popup Table, Yale Divinity Library


Thursday, February 23, 1:30-3:30 pm, Yale Divinity Library, 409 Prospect


Drop by to learn about Fair Use (*see below) and how you can analyze the four factors of Fair Use in your own work. Librarians will provide a helpful handout and candy!


Copyright Protection Gave Superman the Ability to Stop Bullets; Fair Use Made Him a God


Friday, February 24, 3:00 pm, Sterling Memorial Library Lecture Hall


Superman is a Depression-era hero thriving in a post-industrial world. His many iterations began with a short story written by a high school student about a mad scientist who performed experiments on men waiting in bread lines. Superman was the mad scientist, he was bald, and he was not a “good guy.” The two high school students who continued to develop Superman eventually realized that people living through the Great Depression needed a hero who could root out corruption, manhandle machines, and sympathize with human frailty. Without early copyright protection, Superman almost certainly would not have developed into the well-known character he is today. Without the Fair Use exception to copyright infringement, however, Superman would not have developed into an archetype. Through Superman, we will trace the history of Fair Use and highlight its importance. The talk will be given by Anderson Duff, Partner at Revision Legal, New York, NY.

A full listing of library events can be found here.


*Material provided at all events is for information purposes only and should not be considered legal advice