October 2015 Archives

October 1, 2015

The Library recently welcomed a new Director of Development. Basie Bales Gitlin ’10 B.A. brings to the position a remarkable combination of Yale knowledge, fundraising experience, and a deep and abiding love for libraries.   

During his college years, Basie worked as a curatorial assistant at the Beinecke Library and catalogued books for two rare book firms while forging an academic specialty in the history of the book. His dissertation at the University of Cambridge, from which he received an M.Phil. in 2011, examined how British donors were solicited for gifts to the Harvard and Yale libraries in the colonial period. In 2012, he joined the Yale Office of Development as a staff writer in the stewardship department. For the last two and a half years, as a front-line fundraiser for the Yale School of Management, he helped to establish the school’s reunion and leadership giving programs and built strong relationships with countless donors, many of them new to philanthropy.

In his spare time, he serves on the boards of the Mory’s Association and the Yale Alumni Fund, interviews prospective students as an Alumni Schools Committee member, and is a Fellow of Davenport College. He also co-chaired his 5th Reunion Gift Committee. With his father, Jay Gitlin, he co-authored a book, Mory’s: A Brief History (2014), and an essay on Elihu Yale for the Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin 2012. A serious book collector, Basie has focused his efforts on the history of Yale and the history of books, libraries, and printing; he is an active member of the Grolier Club in New York City, the oldest society of bibliophiles in North America. His other hobbies include practicing and competing with the Yale Graduate Crew, haunting the Payne Whitney squash courts, and playing the drums.

Please don’t hesitate to contact Basie with any questions relating to library fundraising. You can reach him at basie.gitlin@yale.edu or at 203 432-9851.

Post on October 1, 2015 - 11:31am |

October 2, 2015

The Research Data Consultation Group is a collaborative, university-wide group created to provide consultation on data management best practices, implement data management services, and help link users to resources. The RDCG’s membership includes experts in data management, metadata, information technology, and preservation as well as domain expertise in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.

RDCG can, for example:

  • Assist in the creation and implementation of federally mandated data management plans as well as data management plans created outside of federal mandate requirements
  • Assist researchers in finding, acquiring, and using research data for research and teaching purposes
  • Consult on best practices and implementation services for: metadata, data collection, study design, information security, data analysis, research computing, and long term preservation and access

Visit the Research Data Consultation Group website to learn more and to request a consultation.

Post on October 2, 2015 - 4:51pm |

October 12, 2015

Thursday, October 15, 4:00 pm, Sterling Memorial Library Lecture Hall

Julieanna L. Richardson is the Founder and Executive Director of The HistoryMakers, the largest national collection effort of African American video oral histories on record. Richardson graduated from Brandeis University in 1976 with a B.A. in Theatre Arts and American Studies, from Harvard Law School with her J.D. degree in 1980, and has also been awarded Honorary Doctorates from both Howard University and Dominican University. With a diverse background in theatre, television production, and the cable television industries, she combined her various work experiences and her passion for history to conceptualize, found and build The HistoryMakers, a national, 501(c)(3) non-profit educational institution headquartered in Chicago.

Committed to preserving, developing, and providing access to an archival collection of 5,000 African American video oral histories, The HistoryMakers currently includes interviews with over 2,700 interviewees (9,000 hours of videotaped interviews) from 180 cities and towns as well as internationally, in addition to tens of thousands of documents, photographs, and digital images. The HistoryMakers Digital Archive has users in 51 countries around the world, from Afghanistan to Norway to Ghana. Included in the collection are the personal narratives of both well known and unsung African Americans including statesman General Colin Powell, poets Nikki Giovanni and Sonia Sanchez, civic leaders Vernon Jordan and Marion Wright Edelman, musicians Quincy Jones, Herbie Hancock and Ramsey Lewis, political leaders Congresswoman Maxine Waters and President Barack Obama when he was an Illinois State Senator and Alonzo Pettie, the oldest living African American cowboy. Younger HistoryMakers include Russell Simmons, Melissa Harris Perry and Charles Blow. Last year, the Library of Congress became the permanent repository for The HistoryMakers Collection, described as “a rich and diverse resource for scholars, teachers, students and documentarians seeking a more complete record of our nation’s history and its people.”

The talk is sponsored by the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library and the Public Humanities at Yale and is free and open to the public.

Post on October 12, 2015 - 10:41am |

October 12, 2015

From October 19-24, the Yale Library will be marking international Open Access Week with a series of wide ranging events, from the use of data, images and government documents, to knowing your rights as an author and understanding 'predatory publishers'. All events are listed on the library calendar.

Post on October 12, 2015 - 12:16pm |

October 14, 2015

All are welcome to join us for this talk on on Wednesday, October 21 at 9:00 am in the SML Lecture Hall "Bringing Japan to Yale", by Robert G. Wheeler, Professor Emeritus of Engineering and Applied Physics at Yale. A curator of the current Peabody Museum exhibit Samurai and the Culture of Japan’s Great Peace, he will discuss some of the featured objects donated by individuals whose papers are in Manuscripts and Archives - Mabel Loomis Todd, Henry W. Farnam, and Shepherd Stevens. In addition, aspects of the science of swords and lacquerware will be illustrated.

From the Yale University Press book on the exhibit co-authored by Robert Wheeler: “this lavishly illustrated volume takes readers on a journey into Japan’s early modern cultural and political history. It also offers tantalizing glimpses of medieval Japan and the technology underlying the material culture of the samurai. Some objects are dazzling aesthetic and technical feats: impossibly intricate lacquerware, swords as bright and sharp as the day they were forged, and glittering suits of armor from daimyo collections. Others are more unassuming, but equally capable of evoking visions of a lost world.”

Post on October 14, 2015 - 2:42pm |

October 19, 2015

Thursday, October 29, 4:00 pm, Center for Science and Social Science Information (CSSSI), 24 hour space, 219 Prospect.

All are welcome to join us for a talk by Graeme Reid, Director of the LGBT Rights Program at Human Rights Watch and Adjunct Faculty in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Yale.

The rights of LGBT people remain a highly contested and divisive issue internationally. While significant progress has been made, many challenges remain. An overview of key trends will be presented.

Post on October 19, 2015 - 12:56pm |

October 19, 2015

Thursday, October 29, 4:00 pm, SML Lecture Hall

The James Weldon Johnson Memorial Lecture celebrates American poet, novelist, and civil rights leader James Weldon Johnson, namesake of the collection of African American arts and letters at the Beinecke Library. Farah Jasmine Griffin (Ph.D.’92) is William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University. Her most recent book, Harlem Nocturne, tells the stories of three World War II-era African American women artists who fought for change on the home front.
Professor Griffin's interests include American and African American literature, music, history and politics. The recipient of numerous honors and awards for her teaching and scholarship, in 2006-2007 Professor Griffin was a fellow at the New York Public Library Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. She is the author of Who Set You Flowin’: The African American Migration Narrative (Oxford, 1995), If You Can’t Be Free, Be a Mystery: In Search of Billie Holiday (Free Press, 2001) and Clawing At the Limits of Cool: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and the Greatest Jazz Collaboration Ever (Thomas Dunne, 2008).

This presentation is sponsored by The Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and the Department of African American Studies at Yale.

Post on October 19, 2015 - 12:54pm |

October 19, 2015

The Beinecke Library is delighted to announce the first event of its speaker series for this year, a public lecture followed by a seminar with Joseph Dane (Professor of English, USC).

On Wednesday, October 28, he will deliver a lecture, "How Many Chaucerians Does it Take to Count to Ten? Horrors of the Obvious in Humanities Research," and on Thursday, October 29, he will join us in a seminar environment to discuss an essay titled "The Haunting of Suckling's Fragmenta Aurea (1646)," attached to this message alongside some supplementary reading from his book Blind Impressions.

Medieval studies graduate student Emily Ulrich will start our Thursday discussion with a prepared response. These events are sure to be great, and we hope to see you at one or both.​

The Yale Program in the History of the Book brings together scholars across disciplines to explore the materiality of the written word over time and across cultures.

Post on October 19, 2015 - 12:45pm |

October 19, 2015

Rock, Paper, Scissors: Dimensionality and Neoclassical Aesthetics in the Art and Fashion of the 1790s

All are welcome to join us for this talk on Wednesday, October 28, 5:30 pm, in the SML Lecture Hall followed by a reception in the Memorabilia Room. The talk is presented in connection with the exhibition "Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women" on view at the Lewis Walpole Library, September 24, 2015 through February 26, 2016

In the 1790s, women dressed in imitation of antique statuary. Yet most devotees of the style had never seen the originals they emulated; rather, they were inspired by print representations of them, and this process of translation--from three-dimensional sculptures into two-dimensional paper representations and then back into fabric gowns swathed around moving bodies--created several interesting effects, including a pronounced emphasis on contour. This lecture will discuss the way 1790s fashionable dress was mediated by print, and connect this phenomenon to the contemporary vogue for John Flaxman's outline drawings and other aspects of neoclassical taste.

Amelia Rauser is the author of Caricature Unmasked: Irony, Authenticity, and Individualism in Eighteenth-Century English Prints (2008). Her new project, "Living Statues: Neoclassical Culture and Fashionable Dress in the 1790s-- London, Paris, Naples," is a study of the radical style of undress in the 1790s and its connection to contemporary aesthetic, political, and scientific thought. Dr. Rauser is Professor of Art History at Franklin & Marshall College.
Enter through 128 Wall Street door.

Post on October 19, 2015 - 12:25pm |

October 19, 2015

Wednesday, October 21, 9:00 am, SML Lecture Hall

All are welcome to join us for this talk on "Bringing Japan to Yale", by Robert G. Wheeler, Professor Emeritus of Engineering and Applied Physics at Yale. A curator of the current Peabody Museum exhibit Samurai and the Culture of Japan’s Great Peace, he will discuss some of the featured objects donated by individuals whose papers are in Manuscripts and Archives - Mabel Loomis Todd, Henry W. Farnam, and Shepherd Stevens. In addition, aspects of the science of swords and lacquerware will be illustrated.

From the Yale University Press book on the exhibit co-authored by Robert Wheeler:
“this lavishly illustrated volume takes readers on a journey into Japan’s early modern cultural and political history. It also offers tantalizing glimpses of medieval Japan and the technology underlying the material culture of the samurai. Some objects are dazzling aesthetic and technical feats: impossibly intricate lacquerware, swords as bright and sharp as the day they were forged, and glittering suits of armor from daimyo collections. Others are more unassuming, but equally capable of evoking visions of a lost world.”

Post on October 19, 2015 - 12:21pm |

October 19, 2015

Tuesday, October 20, 1:00pm, SML Lecture Hall

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in America, killing nearly 300,000 women a year – more than breast and lung cancers combined. In her talk, Dr Spatz will lay out an approach to cardiovascular health for women of all ages. From her perspective as a cardiologist, she’ll discuss why blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar intake matter, and how lifestyle behaviors – nutrition, fitness and stress management – can make a genuine difference. She will also examine the promise of new technologies and explain what the advent of personalized medicine will mean to current and future generations. The talk is sponsored by Yale University Library and Yale Health, and is free and open to the public.

Dr. Erica Spatz is a general cardiologist and Assistant Professor in the Section of Cardiovascular Medicine at Yale. Her research is focused on preventing cardiovascular disease and improving health outcomes following a major cardiovascular event, especially among women and socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Dr. Spatz’ research translates into more personalized medicine, taking into account individuals’ unique risk factors and clinical presentations – to develop customized treatment plans. She is currently supported by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) in Patient Centered Outcomes Research, and is a clinical investigator at the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE). Her latest research on women with myocardial infarctions (heart attacks) appears in this month’s issue of Circulation.

Post on October 19, 2015 - 12:17pm |