March 2018 Archives

March 2, 2018

A trial for a Chinese language database, Zhonghua zai zao shan ben shu ju ku 中华再造善本数据库, has been set up for Yale University users from now to April 1, 2018. The database has been added to the Library’s Chinese studies research guide. Since the access is controlled by Yale IP ranges, you have to login Yale VPN first to get access from off-campus locations. User’s guide is available.

Produced by the National Library of China Press, the database contains 1,312 titles (more than 700,000 pages) of Chinese rare books from some finest collections at the National Library of China. Many titles included in these databases are not available anywhere in the world. Search options include title, author, edition, summary and seal. 

Please feel free to contact Michael Meng, Librarian for Chinese Studies, if you have any questions about the trial.

Post on March 2, 2018 - 1:17pm |

March 2, 2018

A trial for a Chinese language database, Minguo tu shu shu ju ku 民国图书数据库, has been set up for Yale University users from now to April 1, 2018. The database has been added to the Library’s Chinese studies research guide. Since the access is controlled by Yale IP ranges, you have to login Yale VPN first to get access from off-campus locations. User’s guide is available.

Produced by the National Library of China Press, the database contains about 150,000 titles (more than 28,590,000 pages) of Chinese books published between 1911 and 1949. The subjects include not only humanities and social sciences, but also technology, natural and medical sciences. Many titles included in these databases are not available anywhere in the world.

Please feel free to contact Michael Meng, Librarian for Chinese Studies, if you have any questions about the trial.

Post on March 2, 2018 - 12:51pm |

March 12, 2018

Why Do We Need DH?: Digital Humanities in China

Speaker: Jing Chen  陈静

Associate Professor, School of Arts, Nanjing University

Founder & Editor, 01Lab (零壹 Lab)

Time: 2:00 pm-3:00 pm, Friday April 6

Place: Room 218, Sterling Memorial Library

Sponsored by the East Asia Library, Digital Humanities Lab and Council on East Asian Studies at Yale University.

Following the recent appearance of Digital Humanities publications, workshops, and social media groups, DH has emerged as a new field in China. But, if DH is understood as a merger between humanities domain knowledge and quantitative tools like Natural Language Processing, GIS, or digital archiving, then how new, exactly, is DH in China? What are the stakes of using “DH” to rename a network of older work? Answering such questions is important for appreciating the current status of DH in the Chinese academy, but also helpful for both situating the DH landscape within a global research dynamic and understanding local knowledge production in an age of digital media. This speech focuses on early DH practitioners, particularly their understanding of the role of digital media, computational tools, and algorithms in humanities research by reflecting on local media practices, shifts in incentives from doing library-based research to more individual work, the new urgency to share resources and improving cyberinfrastructure, and the necessity of advancing digital literacy in the newest generation of scholars.

Jing Chen is Associate Professor of School of Arts at Nanjing University. She also serves as the executive director of the Center for Digital Humanities Innovation and Studies at Nanjing University. Dr. Chen worked at Rice University’s Chao Center for Asian Studies as the Henry Luce Postdoctoral Fellow from 2012 to 2014. Her current interest focuses on Digital Humanities, image studies and Cultural and Media Studies, especially the visual knowledge production during the transformation of media. She is the project manager of the Ephemera Project and the Chinese Commercial Advertisement Archive (1880-1940). She is also the Co-PI for the project of the Virtual Museum of the Grand Canal of China (Jinagsu section). She has guest-edited on special issues on Digital Humanities for academic journals in China including Library Development, Library Tribune and Cultural Studies. She is the executive editor of Digital Humanities Studies, a monographic series soon to be published by the Nanjing University Press. Dr. Chen is the founder and editor of 01Lab (零壹Lab), a popular public WeChat journal on DH.

Post on March 12, 2018 - 2:45pm |

March 13, 2018

Curating Revolution: Politics on Display in Mao's China

Speaker: Denise Ho

Assistant Professor of History, Yale University

Time: 4:30 pm-5:30 pm, Thursday April 19

Place: International Room, Sterling Memorial Library

(Coffee and cookies will be provided before the talk at 4:00 pm)

How did China’s Communist revolution transform the nation’s political culture? In this rich and vivid history of the Mao period (1949–1976), Denise Y. Ho examines the relationship between its exhibitions and its political movements. Case studies from Shanghai show how revolution was curated: museum workers collected cultural and revolutionary relics; neighborhoods, schools, and work units mounted and narrated local displays; and exhibits provided ritual space for ideological lessons and political campaigns. Using archival sources, ephemera, interviews, and other materials, Ho traces the process by which exhibitions were developed, presented, and received. Examples under analysis range from the First Party Congress Site and the Shanghai Museum to the ‘class education’ and Red Guard exhibits that accompanied the Socialist Education Movement and the Cultural Revolution. Operating in two modes - that of a state in power and that of a state in revolution - Mao era exhibitionary culture remains part of China’s revolutionary legacy.

Denise Y. Ho is an historian of modern China, with a particular focus on the social and cultural history of the Mao period (1949-1976). She is also interested in urban history, the study of information and propaganda, and the history of memory. Ho teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on modern and contemporary China, the history of Shanghai, the uses of the past in modern China, and the historiography of the Republican era and the P.R.C.

Denise Y. Ho received her B.A. in history from Yale College and an A.M. and Ph.D. in history from Harvard University.

Read more about Professor Ho's new book: Curating Revolution: Politics on Display in Mao's China

 

Post on March 13, 2018 - 2:14pm |