March 2017 Archives

March 30, 2017

LibraryStack.org

The Arts Library's trial access to LibraryStack.org runs through April 30. Library Stack is a growing database of born-digital books, audio, videos, apps, and documents related to contemporary art and design, with intersections into cultural criticism, media studies, architecture and philosophy. Discovery of contemporary art resources, even those available on the open web, can be a challenge, and Library Stack seeks to collocate them, archive them, and make them searchable through additional metadata and an engaging interface. For some items, only a citation or link is available, while others offer a full download. Please contact Library Stack with feedback on the new platform.

Post on March 30, 2017 - 5:41pm |

April 18, 2017

Introduction to Git/Hub

April 18 from 4:00-5:00pm in Bass Library, L06 

This workshop will familiarize participants with the fundamentals of Git and GitHub. Git—a free, open source version control system—and GitHub—a popular repository for sharing code—are key for web development projects and programming more broadly. Together, ​they provide a robust system for collaborating with team members and finding existing code that you might adopt and adapt for your own projects. Participants will gain hands-on experience creating repositories and branches, managing pull requests, and committing changes.

The workshop is open to Yale students, faculty, and staff, but space is limited. To register, please visit the YUL Instruction Calendar. Windows computers will be available for use, but participants are encouraged to bring their own laptops (Mac or Windows).

Co-sponsored by the Yale Digital Humanities Lab and Float Yale.

---

Instructor: Douglas Duhaime (DHLab)

Post on March 29, 2017 - 10:47am |

April 12, 2017

Intro to Network Analysis with Gephi

April 12 from 2:00-3:30pm in Bass Library, L06

This workshop will provide a broad overview of network analysis. In addition to covering what networks are, how to read them, and why you might want to use them, we'll also demonstrate how to generate them using Gephi — open-source, multi-platform visualization software. During the workshop, participants will learn how to construct node and edge lists, import them into Gephi, and export them using a variety of plugins designed for sharing your network over the web. 

Sample data will be provided at the workshop, but participants are welcome to bring their own for discussion at the end.

Windows machines will be available for use, but participants are encouraged to work from their own (Mac or Windows) laptops. 

The workshop is open to Yale students, faculty, and staff, but space is limited. To register, please visit the YUL Instruction Calendar.

----

Instructors: Catherine DeRose (DHLab) and Joshua Dull (StatLab)

Post on March 29, 2017 - 10:42am |

March 21, 2017

Our Robert Frank Weekend includes two screenings: the documentary DON'T BLINK - ROBERT FRANK with director Laura Israel and journalist Nicholas Dawidoff in person (7:00pm Friday, April 14), and a 30th anniversary screening of Frank's CANDY MOUNTAN in 35mm (7:00pm Saturday, April 15), both at the Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall Street). These screenings are free and always open to everyone. Visit our Events page to learn more.

Post on March 27, 2017 - 8:00pm |

March 24, 2017

Know before You Go: Researching East Asia in US

Part IV. Asian Division, Library of Congress

Speakers: Dr. Yuwu Song, Reference Specialist

               Mr. Eiichi Ito, Reference Specialist

Time: 12:00 pm-1:00 pm, Friday April 7

Place: Room 218, Sterling Memorial Library

Sponsored by the East Asia Library and Council on East Asian Studies at Yale University. Light lunch will be provided.

Post on March 24, 2017 - 10:00am |

March 21, 2017

On July 1, 2017, the Yale Film Study Center became part of the Yale University Library. The FSC was founded in 1982 and traces its roots to film collections at Yale dating back to the 1960s. As an Associate of the International Federation of Film Archives, the FSC is committed to supporting teaching, learning, and research, and to fostering a robust film culture at Yale through collection, preservation, access, and exhibition. Visit us at 53 Wall Street. FAQ.

Post on March 21, 2017 - 10:40am |

March 21, 2017

Know before You Go: Researching East Asia in US

Part III. East Asian Collection, University of Chicago

Speakers: Dr. Yuan Zhou, Curator

Time: 12:00 pm-1:00 pm, Friday March 31

Place: Room 218, Sterling Memorial Library

Sponsored by the East Asia Library and Council on East Asian Studies at Yale University. Light lunch will be provided.

Post on March 21, 2017 - 11:48am |

March 17, 2017

Come to the Medical Historical Library (333 Cedar Street) on Friday, April 7 at 12 noon, for a live musical revue of selections from the current exhibit Yale Medicine Goes to War, 1917. Bring your lunch and enjoy the medically themed ballads and marches inspired by the nation’s entrance into World War I. Songs will be performed by library and development staff members, and doctors from the Medical School. Join us!

Post on March 17, 2017 - 10:39am |

March 17, 2017

All are welcome to join us on April 3 at 4:30 pm in the SML Lecture Hall for the latest talk in our Sterling Memorial Library book talk series, On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, by Timothy Snyder, the Richard Levin Professor of History at Yale University.

The Founding Fathers tried to protect us from the threat they knew, the tyranny that overcame ancient democracy. Today, our political order faces new threats, but our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience.

In just a matter of weeks, the United States has seen unprecedented changes to the fabric of its national and global identity. In On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, Timothy Snyder offers today’s reader a guide to identifying and understanding the parallels that exist between our current reality and the reality faced by Europeans of the twentieth century. Through the 1920s, ’30s, and ’40s, democracies across Europe would yield to fascism, Nazism, and communism. Americans have always held tight to the belief that such regime change can’t happen here—but that is a dangerous illusion. Having spent his career examining the tragedies and atrocities of the twentieth century, Snyder has studied the ways in which shifts and changes, both large and small, have led to the failure of democratic principles and ideals. As he writes, “history does not repeat, but it does instruct”—and we must heed its warnings. But Snyder goes further, using history to show us how to effectively resist and bring about change.

On Tyranny offers invaluable ideas for how we can preserve our freedoms in the uncertain years to come through a series of twenty lessons.

Coffee and cookies will be offered at 4:00 pm before the presentation.

Post on March 17, 2017 - 10:33am |

March 17, 2017

All are invited to a talk and reception on Friday, April 7 at 2:15 pm in the SML Lecture Hall about Justice at Dachau – a two-hour presentation that explores the largest yet least known war crimes trials in history.

Told through the eyes of William Denson, chief prosecutor, it explores his attempts to achieve justice for the victims of the Holocaust and the procedural and psychic obstacles he faced during the more than two years he worked on the trials. Special investigators working in the field of international law today recognize Denson as a pioneer of universal human rights, for which he received a Presidential citation shortly before his death in 1998.

The presentation, by Joshua M. Greene, is based on his critically acclaimed book, Justice at Dachau: The Trials of an American Prosecutor. Mr. Greene is a former adjunct instructor of religious studies at Hofstra University. His book Witness: Voices from the Holocaust, also critically acclaimed, was adapted for broadcast by PBS. In addition to being an author, Mr. Greene is a documentarian whose credits include Hitler’s Courts: Betrayal of the Rule of Law in Nazi Germany and, most recently, Memory After Belsen: The Future of Holocaust Memory.

A reception will follow the talk. All are welcome.

Sponsored by the Yale University Library, Manuscripts and Archives and Fortunoff Video Archives, and the Lillian Goldman Law Library at the Yale Law School.

Post on March 17, 2017 - 10:27am |

Pages