November 2016 Archives

November 30, 2016

Yale Day of Data 2016 Poster Session and Opening Reception

December 1 from 4:00-6:00pm in the Center for Science and Social Science Information

Yale Day of Data is a two-day, University-wide event that will feature speakers from a number of disciplines across Yale. The theme for 2016 will be open data, open software, and reproducibility initiatives.

To kick off Yale Day of Data 2016, we will begin with an Opening Reception and Poster Session at the Center for Science and Social Science Information. No registration is required; all are invited to attend!

Posters include:

Safer Chemicals Design Diagrams

Longzhu Shen (Yale University), Fjodor Melnikov (Yale University), John Roethle (Yale University), Aditya Gudibanda (Yale University), Richard Judson (US EPA), Julie Zimmerman (Yale University), and Paul Anastas (Yale University)

Urban Environmental Performance Index: The Quito Pilot Case

Diego C. Manya (Yale University), Ryan Thomas (Yale University), and Matthew Moroney (Yale University)

Extracting Geography From Datasets in Social Sciences

Yuke Li (Yale University), Tianhao Wu (Yale University), Nicholas Marshall (Yale University), and Stefan Steinerberger (Yale University)

Closing the Water Budget in an Experimental Urban Watershed: A Comparative Assessment of Methods for Measuring Evapotranspiration

Leana M. Weissberg (Yale University), and Gaboury Benoit (Yale University)

Yale’s Environmental Performance Index: the Construction and Use of a Composite Index for Global Sustainability

Zach Wendling, FES (Yale University)

Penetrance Estimates for Incidental Genomic Findings in ACMG-56

James A. Diao (Yale University)

Need vs. Supply Analysis of the New Haven Public Bus System

Stan Mathis (Yale University)

Do Elephants Eat More Trees When Less Grass is Available? A Field Study in Kruger National Park, South Africa

Emily Goldberg (Yale University)

The Effect of Virtual Civic Engagement on Crime: SeeClickFix in New Haven

Daniel Spakowicz (Yale University), Carolyn J. Presley (Yale University), Dowin Boatright (Yale University), Mark Gerstein (Yale University), Ann Greene (Yale University), Marjorie Rosenthal (Yale University), and Andrew V. Papachristos (Yale University)

Machine Learning to Predict Pupillary Dynamics in Conscious Visual Perception

Jacob S. Prince (Yale University), Jackson Ding (Yale University), and Owen Morgan (St. John's College)

Data Collection and Analysis at the ATLAS Detector

Savannah Thais (Yale University)

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The 2016 Yale Day of Data is sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Center for Science and Social Science Information, Yale Center for Research Computing, Institution for Social and Policy Studies, Yale Digital Humanities Laboratory, Yale Institute for Network Science, Center for Teaching and Learning, and the Sigma XI Distinguished Visitor Fund.

 

Post on November 30, 2016 - 4:47pm |

November 30, 2016

IT Accessibility strives to make online resources available to the widest group of users. Please join us for this SCOPA forum on December 7 at 9:00 am in the Sterling Memorial Library Lecture Hall where presenters will discuss how Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 Level AA will be, and are, being implemented throughout the University and in the Library.

Speakers include: Michael Harris, Information Architect & Accessibility Lead, ITS; David Hirsch, Director of Academic IT Strategy, Center for Teaching & Learning; Tracy MacMath, User Interface Programmer, Library IT; Lisa Sawin, Director of User Experience & Digital Strategy, ITS;  & Steven Wieda, Senior Web Developer, Library IT.

All members of the Yale community are welcome and refreshments will be served.

 

Post on November 30, 2016 - 2:25pm |

November 30, 2016

December 9, 6:30 pm in the Yale University Art Gallery Auditorium (1111 Chapel St., New Haven. Please enter via York or High Streets as main 1111 Chapel St. entrance will not be open)

 

In celebration of the current exhibition at the Haas Family Arts Library and in collaboration with the "Odds and Ends Art Book Fair" at the Yale University Art Gallery, designer/author Warren Lehrer (MFA ’80) will present a multimedia performance/reading of his award-winning illuminated novel, "A Life In Books: The Rise and Fall of Bleu Mobley". In the funny and thought provoking performance, Lehrer presents an overview of his author-protagonist's life in books via many of Mobley's cover designs and other biographical materials including animations and video performances of book excerpts. The performance will take place in the Yale University Art Gallery lecture hall.

Please join us for a pre-performance reception at the Robert B Haas Family Library from 4:30-6:00pm where visitors can view Lehrer’s work in the exhibition. Enter via The Loria Center, 190 York Street. (Directly across York Street from the Yale University Art Gallery lecture hall entrance.)

This program is sponsored by the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, the Yale University Art Gallery, and The Yale University Library Bibliographical Press.

Post on November 30, 2016 - 2:18pm |

November 29, 2016

"Crazy, Yes. But Not Tiny: Networked #FtM Culture, Identity, & Knowledge Production on Tumblr"

Tuesday, November 29 at 11:30am-12:45pm in WLH 309

Jen Jack Gieseking’s research project explores transgender culture production, medical knowledge exchange, and social network development on the social platform Tumblr in trans people’s own words and images. Drawing on text and social network analysis, he has analyzed over one million #ftm public posts collected daily over the last two years, and in this talk, he will discuss the application of digital humanities methods and approaches to the study of everyday trans life. As a central meeting place for transgender people across nations and generations, these materials help to inform our understanding about the first simultaneous, international production of a gender identity.

Series Organizer: T.L. Cowan, Presidential Visiting Professor, WGSS and DHLab

Sponsored by the Yale DHLab, Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies & Yale Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies

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Jen Jack Gieseking is an Assistant Professor of American Studies at Trinity College.

Post on November 29, 2016 - 10:16am |

November 28, 2016

Register now for the annual Day of Data December 1-2 in the auditorium of the Yale Center for Research Computing. This Yale-wide event will focus on research transparency & reproducibility across disciplines, including presentations on open data, open software, reproducibility initiatives, & replication. Speakers on December 2 will include Harlan Krumholz, Harold H. Hines, Jr. Professor of Medicine & Director of the Yale Center for Outcomes Research & Evaluation; Erin McKiernan, Professor of Physics, Biomedical Physics Program, National Autonomous University of Mexico; & Brian Nosek, co-founder & director, Center for Open Science. To register, click here.

Post on November 27, 2016 - 10:14pm |

November 28, 2016

All are welcome to join us on December 7 in the Sterling Memorial Library lecture hall for the latest talk in the Arts and Humanities Book Talk series by Howard Bloch, Sterling Professor of French at Yale University. The talk will begin at 4:30 pm, but please join us from 4:00 pm for refreshments.  

It was, improbably, the forerunner of our digital age: a French poem about a shipwreck published in 1897 that, with its mind-bending possibilities of being read up and down, backward and forward, even sideways, launched modernism. Stéphane Mallarmé’s One Toss of the Dice, a daring, twenty-page epic of ruin and recovery, provided an epochal “tipping point,” defining the spirit of the age and anticipating radical thinkers of the twentieth century, from Albert Einstein to T. S. Eliot. Celebrating its intrinsic influence on our culture, R. Howard Bloch decodes the poem still considered among the most enigmatic ever written.

In Bloch’s portrait of Belle Époque Paris, Mallarmé stands as the spiritual giant of the era, gathering around him every Tuesday a luminous cast of characters including Émile Zola, Victor Hugo, Claude Monet, André Gide, Claude Debussy, Oscar Wilde, and even the future French prime minister Georges Clemenceau. A simple schoolteacher whose salons and prodigious literary talent won him the adoration of Paris’s elite, Mallarmé achieved the reputation of France’s greatest living poet. Over a century later, the allure of Mallarmé’s linguistic feat continues to ignite the imaginations of the world’s greatest thinkers. Featuring a new, authoritative translation of the French poem by J. D. McClatchy, One Toss of the Dice reveals how a literary masterpiece launched the modernist movement, contributed to the rise of pop art, influenced modern Web design, and shaped the perceptual world we now inhabit.

Post on November 27, 2016 - 10:22pm |

November 22, 2016

Favorite Recipes of the Movie Stars, a magazine published in 1931 featuring dishes favored by famous actors, is among a number of intriguing materials from the Middle Ages through the 20th-century housed in the Beinecke’s collection. A small portion of the cookbooks feature recipes from the rich and famous, so anyone on the hunt for offbeat dishes for Thanksgiving dinner could do worse than to page through these quirky culinary artifacts. “Please don’t thank me, thank Alice B. Toklas,” one could explain to guests who have just enjoyed “Potatoes Crainquebille” from The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book — several editions of which are held at the library. Read more in this YaleNews article.

Post on November 22, 2016 - 11:04am |

November 22, 2016

Same-sex marriage has evolved from a far-fetched notion to established law in the United States over the past four decades. At the forefront of this modern civil rights movement has been a Yale alumnus, Evan Wolfson ’78. Wolfson wrote his Harvard Law School thesis on same-sex marriage long before it became a topic of national & local activism. He founded Freedom to Marry in 2001, serving as its president until the Supreme Court’s historic 2015 decision guaranteeing marriage equality. Along with his many other awards, Wolfson was honored with a Yale-Jefferson Public Service Award earlier this month. He donated Freedom to Marry’s archives to Yale in 2015, explaining why in this YaleNews story.

Post on November 22, 2016 - 11:00am |

November 21, 2016

Warren Lehrer performs "A Life in Books"

Warren Lehrer (MFA ’80) to perform “A Life in Books" on December 9 at 6:30 pm

Free and open to the public.

In celebration of the current exhibition at the Haas Family Arts Library  The Book As Stage: Performance and Theater in the Book Arts

In conjunction with the Odds and Ends Art Book Fair at the Yale University Art Gallery

Designer/author Warren Lehrer (MFA ’80) will present a multimedia performance/reading of his award-winning illuminated novel A Life In Books: The Rise and Fall of Bleu Mobley. In the funny and thought provoking performance, Lehrer presents an overview of his author-protagonist's life in books via many of Mobley's cover designs and other biographical materials including animations and video performances of book excerpts. 

The performance will take place in the Yale University Art Gallery lecture hall.  Please enter via York or High Streets. (Entrance will not be possible from the main door at 1111 Chapel Street.)

Please join us for a reception before the performance from 4:30-6pm where visitors can view Lehrer’s work in the exhibition. Lower level, Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, enter via The Loria Center, 190 York Street. (Directly across York Street from the Yale University Art Gallery lecture hall entrance.)

This program is sponsored by the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, the Yale University Art Gallery, and The Yale University Library Bibliographical Press.

Contact Jae Rossman, Associate Director for Special Collections & Public Programs, Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, with questions. 

Post on November 21, 2016 - 9:38am |

A costume design for Tiffany, and a costume design for Butch Cassidy, designed by Edith Head

The George Roy Hill Collection serves as both an examination of the creative as well as the physical labor that went into making feature films. Hill, who directed work such as The World According to Garp and Slaughterhouse-Five, was a student at Yale College (Class of 1943), and opted to give his collection to Yale University because both he and Paul Newman were affiliated with Yale. His best known film, however, is probably Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, starring Paul Newman, Robert Redford, and Katherine Ross

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, which was the top grossing movie of 1969 and went on to win several Academy awards, received critical praise. It features the character who became the namesake for the Sundance Film Festival, which was started by Robert Redford.

Examining the material in this collection shows the tremendous physical, creative, and emotional labor that went into creating a feature film. The costume and set designs, along with the reproduction of some of the few photographs existing of the real Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, show the detail and the dedication of the designers.

A costume design for Tiffany, and a costume design for Butch Cassidy, designed by Edith Head

A costume design for Tiffany, and a costume design for Butch Cassidy, designed by Edith Head. Box 10, Folders 1-2

The creative process was tracked through the scene breakdowns and storyboards, where stunts and critical scenes were carefully planned, shot by shot. These breakdowns are hand drawn and look like animation storyboards. These shots also required a great deal of technical skill. Hill speaks in an interview about the methods they used to capture particularly important moments–such as the last scene of the film, which is a freeze-frame–and his thought process that spoke to the legend of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid returning in this final moment right before they died.

Storyboard for the film, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

Storyboard for the film, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Box 24

The creative team worked hard on the style and flair of the film; this translated into an iconic film, with iconic moments that linger in cinema history.

Paul Newman as Butch Cassidy and Robert Redford as the Sundance Kid photograph

Paul Newman as Butch Cassidy and Robert Redford as the Sundance Kid photograph. Box 6 Folder 1

But looking into the collection shows that this movie and its legacy was not easily won. George Roy Hill, the director, seemed to be in constant conflict with William Goldman, the screenwriter. He treated Goldman’s concerns about changing the script lightly and regarded his notes as funny but inconsequential. Hill wrote to Goldman, in a letter dated May 7, 1969:

You will be happy to know that during the last going through the movie for corrections, I read your notes to the editors and your letter and at the moments, our notes are getting more laughs than the movie. We are doing nothing with them, but it provides us with general merriment in our travail.

If you feel any reluctance about fulfilling the above request I am sure that a recollection of what comes when I’m left to my own devices will spur you to the needed effort. [Box 1, Folder 5]

Goldman, in reply, wrote a letter dated May 12, 1969. He seemed particularly incensed at the notion that any changes to the script were made without his consent, and compared the request from actors for additional material to clarify intent to asking Shakespeare to allow the actor playing Ophelia to suggest Hamlet ad-lib that “maybe I should kill myself” in the middle of Hamlet’s famous ‘To be, or not to be’ soliloquy. He charged Hill with protecting his work, stating:

I have no idea what the fucking actors actually said since the script girl was a microcephalic and the director less than lax when it came to PROTECTING MY FUCKING DIALOG [Box 1, Folder 5]

In fact, these two argued about almost everything in the movie, including hiring Burt Bacharach to do the score – the point where Hill hired him without consent, in the middle of an argument with Goldman. None of this, however, detracted from good art. Goldman, for his part, won an Academy award for the script, and Bacharach won an Academy award for the song Raindrops Are Falling on My Head, written for this film. So in this regard, whether the conflict was as volatile as Goldman’s letters suggest or as mild as Hill’s, the dedication of the designers, the screenwriter, and the director resulted in a film whose legacy includes being on several lists of the best films and screenplays of the first hundred years of cinema.

Post on November 21, 2016 - 8:49am |

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