January 2020 Archives

January 28, 2020

January 23–May 19, 2020

As we celebrate 50 years of women in Yale College and 150 years of women in Yale’s graduate and professional schools, a glance back into the archives shows us that women have been students, faculty, and staff in the Yale School of Drama since its beginnings as the Department of Drama in 1925. Championed by founding chair George Pierce Baker, women made up one-third of the first classes in the Department of Drama and one of the four first teaching faculty. Women have been involved in all aspects of theater production at Yale from the earliest days, and they have brought their talents to teaching, writing, and creating theater around the world. This exhibition, drawn from materials in Arts Library Special Collections and Manuscripts and Archives, highlights just a few of those first women.

Curated by Lindsay King, Associate Director for Access and Research Services, Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, Yale University

Post on January 28, 2020 - 1:10pm |

January 28, 2020

Experiments in French Silent Cinema explores films from various 1920s avant-garde movements, presented with live musical accompaniment by Donald Sosin and Joanna Seaton. In addition to Germaine Dulac's The Smiling Madame Beudet, the night features Entr'acte and Paris Qui Dort by René Clair, as well as Un Chien Andalou by Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel. Screening in conjunction with the course "Global Silent Cinema" with an introduction by Oksana Chefranova. Prints from the Yale Film Archive.

Visit the event page.

Time/Date:
7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 17

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT

What is Treasures from the Yale Film Archive?
Treasures from the Yale Film Archive is an ongoing series of classic and contemporary films curated by the Yale Film Study Center and screened at the Whitney Humanities Center.

Post on January 28, 2020 - 2:58pm |

January 27, 2020

Black and white photo of Edith Wharton at her writing desk

Yale University Library has hosted or will host thirteen exhibits for the 50 Women at Yale 150 celebration. Eleven of the library exhibits explore aspects of women’s history at Yale, while the Senior Essay Exhibits for 2019 and 2020 showcase two contemporary students’ research into the lives and work of women writers.

Library collections together with research by librarians and archivists are central in the commemoration of two historic milestones: the matriculation of the first women students in Yale College in 1969 and the opening of the Yale School of Art in 1869, with the university’s first women students.

The 50 Women at Yale initiative aims “to showcase the depth of women’s contributions to Yale and to the world, to celebrate women at the university, and to inspire thoughtful conversation about the future of women at Yale and in the larger society.”

University Archivist Michael Lotstein has developed an extensive research guide to the history of co-education at Yale.  

All library exhibits are free and open to the public.  See library hours.

These 50 Women at Yale 150 exhibits are on view now:

These 50 Women at Yale 150  Exhibits will open in 2020:

  • Women in Science and Engineering at Yale University 2020, Marx Science and Social Science Library Media Wall, Kline Biology Tower, curated by Lori Bronars (Life Science Librarian, CSSSI) and Gwyneth Crowley (Librarian for Economics, Psychology and Statistics and Data Science, CSSSI) and designed by Mark Saba (Information Technology Services), April - December 2020
  • Edith Wharton: Designing the Drawing Room, 2020 senior essay exhibit, curated by Julia Carabatsos ’20. Sterling Memorial Library Exhibition Corridor, May 4 – Oct. 5, 2020.
  • there are the ones who see me: Celebrating Yale Women Artists, Haas Arts Library, curated by Allison Comrie (Kress Fellow in Art Librarianship) and Mar González Palacios (Associate Director, Arts Library Special Collections), May-Sept 2020.
  • We Were Always Here: Celebrating All Women at Yale, Sterling Memorial Library, Memorabilia Room, curated by Gwyneth Crowley (Librarian for Economics, Psychology and Statistics and Data Science, CSSSI) and Judith Schiff (Chief Research Archivist, Manuscripts and Archives), July 6 – Oct. 23, 2020.
  • Women at Yale in Graphic Design, Haas Arts Library, curated by curated by Miko McGinty (’93 BA, ’98 MFA) and Mar González Palacios (Associate Director, Arts Library Special Collections), Sept 2020 - Jan 2021. (This exhibit will complement On the Basis of Art: 150 Years of Women at Yale, to be presented August 2020 – January 2021 at the Yale University Art Gallery. )

Four 50 Women at Yale 150 exhibits were presented in 2019:

Image: Edith Wharton at her writing desk

Post on January 27, 2020 - 8:28am |

January 24, 2020

Berliner Gramophone Disc

The Irving S. Gilmore Music Library is pleased to announce the completion of a project to describe and provide free open access to a collection of 732 Berliner Gramophone discs from its Historical Sound Recordings (HSR) Collection. In the late 19th Century, Emil Berliner (1851-1929) developed the gramophone, which employed flat disc instead of cylinder based recording technology. Cylinders and discs co-existed for a few years, but eventually Berliner's discs won out and became the dominant technology. The discs in this collection, produced between 1887-1912, represent some of the very first published disc recordings, and offer a unique insight into the earliest years of music and spoken word recording. The recordings are open access, and therefore available to stream by anyone, anywhere, anytime. Access to the collection is available through Archives at Yale.

Availability of this important collection was made possible thanks to a grant to Yale University Library from the Arcadia Fund to support open access initiatives. This fund enabled the music library to further develop its new audiovisual access platform, Aviary. The music library has now added over 2000 recordings to Aviary, providing streaming access to important collections from HSR and Oral History of American Music (OHAM).   

In addition to the recently added Berliner Gramophone discs, the music library has also recently made a collection of 288 test pressings in the Robert Shaw Papers available to stream. These test pressings, produced between 1938-1953, consist primarily of recordings of the Robert Shaw Chorale, with special emphasis on the ensemble's performances of English and American songs such as "America the Beautiful" and "Oklahoma." The test pressings also document some of Shaw's work with the Collegiate Chorale and the RCA Victor and NBC Symphony Orchestras, including performances of the B Minor Mass of Johann Sebastian Bach and the Requiems of Luigi Cherubini and Johannes Brahms. These recordings are available to openly available stream when connected to the Yale network. Patrons outside of Yale can create a free account to then request 30 days free streaming access to any recording in the collection.

Details of other collections now available to stream, can be found in this news post from September 2019.

Post on January 24, 2020 - 9:59am |

January 17, 2020

film still showing a close-up of Tilda Swinton in a grocery store

Tilda Swinton, John C. Reilly, and Ezra Miller star in Lynne Ramsay's We Need to Talk About Kevin, a harrowing story of a mother reeling from a son's unthinkable violence. "Ramsay, filming in lurid reds and unblinking close-ups, lets no one off the hook here," wrote Moira MacDonald. "This is truly a domestic horror story, with no easy answers and nobody blameless." Adapted from the novel by Lionel Shriver, much of this 2011 psychological thriller was filmed nearby in Stamford, CT. 35mm print from the Yale Film Archive.

Visit the event page.

Time/Date:
2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT

What is Treasures from the Yale Film Archive?
Treasures from the Yale Film Archive is an ongoing series of classic and contemporary films in 35mm curated by the Yale Film Study Center and screened at the Whitney Humanities Center.

Post on January 17, 2020 - 9:36am |

January 13, 2020

Still from the film showing an audience sitting in a movie theater.

Told entirely with found footage, Have You Seen My Movie? is a love letter to the magic and power of cinematic experiences as shared by strangers in the dark. From the audience members' rush to get seats to the cool command of the projectionist in the booth, director/editor Paul Anton Smith (assistant editor on Christian Marclay's The Clock) tells the story of movie-going by turning the camera back on the audience. Smith uses iconic and obsure scenes from over a thousand films of every genre, spanning 80 years of cinema, to hold up a mirror to all of the romance, mystery, and mayhem of our collective imaginations. 2016, DCP, UK/Canada, 129 minutes.

Visit the event page.

Time/Date:
7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan, 29

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT

A presentation of the Yale Film Study Center, the Yale Film and Media Studies Program, and Films at the Whitney, supported by the Barbakow Fund for Innovative Film Programs at Yale.

Post on January 13, 2020 - 12:18pm |

January 10, 2020

Join us for a free 35mm screening of In the Realms of the Unreal, accompanied by the classic Maya Deren experimental short Meshes of the Afternoon in 16mm. Directed by Oscar-winning Yale alumna Jessica Yu '87, Realms explores the mysterious life and astonishing artwork of Henry Darger, author and illustrator of a 15,145-page fantasy manuscript about the heroic "Vivian Girls." Prints from the Yale Film Archive.

Visit the event page.

Time/Date:
2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 19

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT

What is Treasures from the Yale Film Archive?
Treasures from the Yale Film Archive is an ongoing series of classic and contemporary films in 35mm curated by the Yale Film Study Center and screened at the Whitney Humanities Center.

Post on January 10, 2020 - 12:14pm |

January 8, 2020

Join us for the 1941 Orson Welles masterpiece Citizen Kane, considered by many to be the greatest film ever made. Welles stars as Charles Foster Kane, a newspaper magnate whose secrets elude reporters after his death. Featuring the Oscar-winning writing of Welles and Herman J. Mankiewicz, the cinematography of Gregg Toland, and the music of Bernard Herrmann, Citizen Kane was part of the first group of films selected for the National Film Registry. Screening in conjunction with the courses "Introduction to Film Studies" and "The Film Archive" with an introduction by John MacKay. 35mm print from the Yale Film Archive.

Visit the event page.

Time/Date:
7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT

What is Treasures from the Yale Film Archive?
Treasures from the Yale Film Archive is an ongoing series of classic and contemporary films in 35mm curated by the Yale Film Study Center and screened at the Whitney Humanities Center.

Post on January 8, 2020 - 10:59am |

January 5, 2020

Black and white photo of male artists sketching female model

Six deeply researched exhibitions currently on display at different Yale Library locations offer new insights into diverse aspects of the history of Yale University and of the university libraries.

The First University Art School: 150 Years of the Yale School of Art, Haas Family Arts Library, 180 York St., through Jan. 18, 2020.

When the School of Fine Arts opened in Street Hall in 1869, Yale became the first university to create an art school. From the beginning, the school educated women as well as men in contemporary artistic practices including drawing, painting, and sculpture. Over the last century, the curriculum expanded to include students in drama, architecture, and design. Historic photographs, departmental records, student work, and other materials are used to show the school’s history and evolution over 150 years. (Curated by Miko McGinty (’93 BA, ’98 MFA) and Mar González Palacios.)

Rescuing Horace Walpole: The Achievement of W.S. Lewis, Lewis Walpole Library 154 Main St., Farmington, through Jan. 24, 2020.

This exhibition pays tribute to the life and legacy of Wilmarth S. Lewis (B.A., 1918) as a scholar-collector, on the 40th anniversary of his bequest of the Lewis Walpole Library to Yale. Drawing heavily on the recently cataloged Lewis archives, the exhibition shows how Lewis’s total dedication to collecting works by and about the 18th century writer Horace Walpole resulted in a collection of extraordinary range and depth, and expressed itself in some surprising ways. It also evolved into a monumental achievement of scholarship in the Yale-Walpole edition, transforming perceptions of Walpole and his age. (Curated by Stephen Clarke.)

From East to West: History of the Chinese Collection at Yale 1849-2019, Memorabilia Room, Sterling Memorial Library, 120 High St., through Feb. 21, 2020.

Six titles of Chinese classical texts were deposited at Yale in August 1849, making the Yale Library the first academic library in the United States to collect Chinese-language books. Samuel Wells Williams, the inaugural Professor of Chinese Language and Literature at Yale, was largely responsible for the earliest acquisitions, and Yung Wing, the first Chinese citizen to graduate from a major American college, was the most important contributor to the founding of Yale’s Chinese Collection. The exhibition draws on collections from the East Asia Library, Manuscripts and Archives, Sterling Memorial Library, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the Haas Family Arts Library. (Curated by Michael Meng.)

Plastic Surgery at Yale: Surgical Expertise, Innovation and History, Cushing Rotunda, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, 333 Cedar St., through Feb. 24, 2020.

In this exhibition, evolving techniques and procedures dating from ancient times through the present day are on display through a sampling of major historical plastic surgery texts from the Medical Historical Library. Discover technologies used in reconstructive and cosmetic surgery today through the models and tools on loan from Yale Plastic Surgery. Learn about innovations from Yale's own plastic surgery faculty through various publications, instruments, and the international. (Curated by Marc E. Walker, with assistance from Melissa Grafe.)

Yale Innovation Remixed, 24-Hour Space, Center for Science and Social Science Information (CSSI), Kline Biology Tower, 219 Prospect St., through March 31, 2020.

The Tsai Center for Innovative Thinking at Yale (CITY) opened in 2017, but innovation has always been embedded in Yale's culture. This media wall exhibit explores the past, present, and future of innovation at Yale, through highlights of Tsai CITY's "Intensives" for students and their many collaborations with campus partners, as well as some of the novel combinations of ideas and concepts that have occurred at Yale across time periods, disciplines, departments, and schools. (Curated by Laura Mitchell (Tsai CITY) and CSSSI librarians.)

Student Research on the History of Women at Yale, Exhibit Corridor, Sterling Memorial Library, through May 4, 2020.

Drawing on multiple library collections, Yale College students Valentina Connell ’20  and Mariana Melin-Corcoran ’20 have curated side-by-side exhibits on two different aspects of women’s history at Yale. Connell’s research looks at the evolution of housing policy and residential life in Yale College over the past fifty years, since the first undergraduate women were admitted in 1969, positing that residential life was one of the most challenging aspects of gender integration at Yale. Melin-Corcoran explores the history of women's involvement in the Yale School of Architecture. The Yale School of Fine Arts enrolled women students from its opening in 1869, but restricted them to more traditional courses of sculpture and painting. When the architecture department was inaugurated in 1916 and until the late 1940s and early 1950s, only men were allowed to enroll.

Post on January 5, 2020 - 4:41pm |