August 2018 Archives

August 30, 2018

Travel to the French Riviera with Grace Kelly and Cary Grant by way of Alfred Hitchcock's To Catch a Thief. The romantic thriller won an Academy Award for cinematography, with additional nominations for costume design and art direction. "In his accustomed manner," wrote critic Bosley Crowther, "Mr. Hitchcock has gone at this job with an omnivorous eye for catchy details and a dandy John Michael Hayes script. Most of his visual surprises are got this time with scenery— with the fantastic, spectacular vistas along the breathtaking Cote d'Azur." 35mm print form the Yale Film Archive.

Visit the event page and download the poster!

Time/Date:
2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 9

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT

What is Treasures from the Yale Film Archive?
Treasures from the Yale Film Archive is an ongoing series of classic and contemporary films in 35mm curated by the Yale Film Study Center and screened at the Whitney Humanities Center.

Treasures screenings are always free and open to the public.

Presented by the Yale Film Study Center and Films at the Whitney with support from Paul L. Joskow '70 M.Phil., '72 Ph.D.

Post on August 30, 2018 - 1:02pm |

August 23, 2018

Students studying at table in Bass

Construction will start in the Spring, after Commencement, on a renovation of the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Library to accommodate the growing student population. Bass Library is a favorite study space for many Yale College students. 

Last renovated in 2007, the two-story underground library holds about 150,000 items, including scholarly works related to the undergraduate curriculum, English-language literature, graphic novels, DVDs, and audiobooks. After renovation, the collection will be curated with the goal of encouraging students to explore and engage with the materials more intensively.  

students studying at table with laptopsThe project, now being led by Assessment Librarian Sarah Tudesco, started last year with open meetings, design charrettes, and a comprehensive study by anthropologist Nancy Fried Foster of how students and faculty perceive and use Bass. 

Among the study’s conclusions:

  • Students go to Bass expecting study space to be available. If they begin to perceive Bass as overcrowded, they will likely go elsewhere.
  • Students choose Bass when they have papers, problem sets, or other work to do for class, and they tend to work alone there, rather than in groups. 
  • Many students find it motivating to have peers working nearby, but they also seek to limit distractions by working in study carrells and individual study spaces.  
  • Students like to work in a library where they are surrounded by books. They seek out course reserve books from the stacks, but they do not spend much time randomly browsing.
  • Faculty place a high value on opportunities for students to use and browse in the physical collections, and especially on the educational impact of serendipitous discoveries.  
  • Some faculty worry that reducing the size of the collection to provide more study space will have a negative effect on students’ library experience and academic development.

To address these factors, the planning committee will continue working with students and faculty to develop an appropriate collection strategy. Architects from DBVW Architects will share designs with faculty, staff, and students for review and comments.

The Bass collection will be housed in the Sterling Library stacks until the project is completed in early 2020.  Some of the Bass books will remain in Sterling, interfiled with the books already in the stack tower.  Others will be returned to the renovated Bass Library.

Post on August 23, 2018 - 2:37pm |

August 23, 2018

Cultural Heritage Crawl poster

Come one, come all to the first ever Cultural Heritage Crawl! 
 
The Arts Library Special Collections (ALSC) hosted an open house from 3-5 pm on Thursday, August 23, as part of a campus-wide Cultural Heritage Crawl. All Yale instructors were encouraged to visit our space, meet the Arts Librarians who can work with their classes, and see some of the ALSC collections available for teaching, learning, and research. 
 
The following repositories participated in the event: 
 
Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Divinity Library
Gilmore Music Library
Lewis Walpole Library
Manuscripts and Archives
Medical Historical Library, Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library
Rare Book Collection, Lillian Goldman Law Library
Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library
Yale Center for British Art
Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
Yale University Art Gallery
 

Post on August 23, 2018 - 10:43am |

August 22, 2018

In 2018, in anticipation of the centenary of the birth of Swedish film director Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007), the Yale Film Study Center began working with the Swedish Film Institute to strike new 35mm prints of eight of Bergman's most iconic films for Yale's collection. In order to create these unique prints from the SFI's preservation negatives, the FSC edited and improved the films' English subtitles and worked with the only remaining film lab in the United States capable of etching laser subtitles onto 35mm films. Support for this project was provided by Marlene and Gene Siskel '67 and by Yale's Fund for Lesbian and Gay Studies.

This fall, these eight new 35mm prints will be shared with Yale and New Haven through four double-feature screenings in Through Bergman's Lens: Ingmar Bergman Centenary Film Series.

Thursday, September 20
6pm Opening Reception
7pm SUMMER WITH MONIKA (1953, 97 mins)
9pm SAWDUST AND TINSEL (1953, 93 mins)

Thursday, October 11
7pm THE SEVENTH SEAL (1957, 96 mins)
9pm THE MAGICIAN (1958, 99 mins)

Thursday, November 15
7pm THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY (1961, 89 mins)
9pm PERSONA (1966, 83 mins)

Thursday, December 6
7pm SMILES OF A SUMMER NIGHT (1955, 108 mins)
9pm WILD STRAWBERRIES (1957, 91 mins)

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Download the Series Poster!

Through Bergman's Lens is presented by the Yale Film Study Center and Films at the Whitney with support from Paul L. Joskow '70 M.Phil., '72 Ph.D.

Post on August 22, 2018 - 2:12pm |

August 20, 2018

Post on August 20, 2018 - 8:26am |

August 17, 2018

 Street Corner Stories, an iconic 1977 documentary produced by filmmaker Warrington Hudlin during the seventies in New Haven.

The Yale Film Study Center has been awarded a $24,000 matching grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation to preserve Street Corner Stories, an iconic 1977 documentary produced by filmmaker Warrington Hudlin ’74 in New Haven.

In Hudlin’s film, convenience store employees, customers, Yale employees, neighborhood kids, and others mix and meet at a New Haven convenience store, sharing jokes and stories, drinking coffee, and talking politics. Shot in cinéma vérité style, the film documents a unique storytelling form, an African American street-corner vernacular that Hudlin presents as a spoken form of the blues.

Street Corner Stories captures a particular story of New Haven and Yale and the interaction between them at a particular point in time,” says Brian Meacham, the center’s archive and special collections manager, who is overseeing the preservation project. “It’s also an important film to preserve in light of Warrington Hudlin’s role in the development of black filmmaking over the last four decades.” 

Warrington Hudlin producer and producer of  the documentary Street Corner Stories.Hudlin was born in East St. Louis, Ill., in 1952 and came to Yale in 1970. During his senior year, he was named to the Scholars of the House program, an honor that came with the responsibility of creating an “essay or project which must justify by its scope and quality the freedom which has been granted.” Hudlin chose to make a film, eventually called Black at Yale: A Film Diary, which grew out of his own “split-consciousness experience” of being an African American student at Yale in a time of heightened political awareness and tension. The Film Study Center preserved Black at Yale in 2017.

Street Corner Stories grew out of one of the final scenes (pictured below) in Black at Yale, in which one of the film’s main characters stops by a convenience store at the corner of Lake Place and Dixwell Avenue and falls into conversation with some of the regulars about their perceptions of Yale. 

“That introduced me to them and their willingness to be on camera,” Hudlin recalls. “And given that I’d just made a film about the university and the black, privileged students’ point of view—I said, what do the people of New Haven think, what do the working class folks think? That became my next P.O.V.”

With funding from the National Endowment for the Arts’ then-new folk art division, Hudlin returned to New Haven in 1976 and began shooting the film in and around the same store. “Men would stop there on the way to work, to get a coffee and a doughnut,” Hudlin says. “It was kind of a launching pad or waiting room before going to work. People who had jobs, for the most part, but most importantly, had a point of view about life, circa 1976.”

The interactions Hudlin captured resonate with the “up-South” accents and sensibility he grew up with in East St. Louis, another community shaped by the post-World War II migration of African Americans from the rural South to the industrial North.  Hudlin’s affinity for the blues, jazz, and rock and roll originated there, too; his neighborhood was home to Ike and Tina Turner, Miles Davis, and the gospel singer Brother Joe May.

In his first year at Yale, he read Ralph Ellison’s essay “Richard Wright’s Blues,” which introduced him to the idea of the blues “as more than a musical form, as an aesthetic and sensibility, an essential view of the world.” Six years later, he brought Ellison’s concept of the blues as a form of storytelling to Street Corner Stories.

The men he filmed, he says, “we're talking on that street corner about their wives and girlfriends, about the people who controlled their working life, about politics, race, the police, all the topics they sing about in the blues. I let people see the connections.”

A convenience store employee and customer talking while shooting  Black at Yale

The film premiered with a screening at the York Square Cinema in New Haven and subsequently screened on the domestic and international festival circuits, where it was well received. One contemporary reviewer called it “an excellent study of black language styles and story-telling.” In recent years, however, the film has been little seen, with only a few known copies.

In 1978, Hudlin and two fellow Yale graduates, George Cunningham ’83 Ph.D. and Alric Nembard ’73, co-founded the Black Filmmakers Foundation, a non-profit that supports and advocates for black filmmakers. As president of the foundation, Hudlin has mentored generations of young filmmakers.  He is also a producer, director, writer, and actor whose credits include House Party (1990), Boomerang (1992), and Cosmic Slop (1994).

“I realize now that when I came into the world as a filmmaker it was like walking into a field that had not been plowed,” Hudlin says.  “I took Street Corner Stories to an art house in New York. The person there asked what language it was in. I said English. And they said, will you have subtitles?

 “We had no access even to independent art houses. We created the first ever black distribution cooperative because we knew colleges and campuses wanted to see our work, but they couldn’t get it. That’s why my background is so hybrid. I had to be writer, producer, distributor, marketer, all those things. If I didn’t do it, it wouldn’t get done. In those days, it wasn’t a glass ceiling. It was a steel and concrete wall.”

The Yale preservation project will use the original and best surviving elements of the film, donated to the Film Study Center by Anthology Film Archives in 2017. Hudlin had given the center a collection of original interviews, trims, outs, and audio elements for the film in 2014, but it was only when preservation work began on Black at Yale in 2016 that the original A/B rolls and optical track negative for Street Corner Stories came to light among a trove of materials Anthology had rescued years earlier from a defunct film lab.

Now, Fotokem, one of the last remaining film labs in the United States, is creating a new 16mm black and white duplicate negative of Street Corner Stories.  Audio Mechanics, an audio restoration lab, will capture and digitally restore the film’s audio, and DJ Audio, specialists in film sound, will create a new optical track negative. Fotokem will create a new 16mm print for screening as well as a high definition digital scan of the new internegative to create a digital access copy of the film.

Last Fall, after the Film Study Center completed the preservation of Black at Yale, Hudlin returned to campus for a screening and discussion with students. The students’ varied responses made Hudlin realize the extent to which the issues that interested him as a young filmmaker remain relevant and unresolved. “The dual consciousness continues,” he says. “It’s the relationship of black people to America.”

Preferring to focus on the future, Hudlin does not spend a lot of time looking back at his earliest films, but he is glad that Yale is preserving them. “It’s history,” he says.  “Unless these details are preserved, you can’t get accurate history.”

The Yale Film Study Center supports teaching, learning, and research, and fosters film culture at Yale through collection, preservation, access, and exhibition.  The center has been part of Yale University Library since 2017. The National Film Preservation Foundation, a nonprofit created by the U.S. Congress to help preserve America’s film heritage, has awarded eight preservation grants to the center and the library since 2008.

Post on August 17, 2018 - 11:14am |

August 16, 2018

The Prospector

This exhibit spotlights twelve publications written, edited and produced between 1965 and 1971 by students of Andover Newton Theological School, Berkeley Divinity School and Yale Divinity School. On Display until January 25, 2019.

Post on August 16, 2018 - 2:40pm |

August 16, 2018

Bishop Berkeley (1685-1753)

The three cases in this exhibit take viewers on a journey through the founding and development of Berkeley Divinity School (BDS), including the institution’s origins in Middletown, its various relocations, and its administrative leadership over the years. On display until January 25, 2019.

Post on August 16, 2018 - 2:28pm |

August 16, 2018

Join us for the fifth year of Treasures from the Yale Film Archive, which begins with five great films in 35mm this fall.

TO CATCH A THIEF (Alfred Hitchcock, 1955)
2pm Sunday, September 9

MEDIUM COOL (Haskell Wexler, 1969)
Co-presented with the Democracy in America series
7pm Saturday, September 29

MARIE ANTOINETTE (Sofia Coppola, 2006)
2pm Sunday, October 21

KATHO UPANISHAD (Ashish Avikunthak, 2011)
Filmmaker in person!
2pm Sunday, November 4

SPRING, SUMMER, FALL, WINTER...AND SPRING (Kim Ki-duk, 2003)
2pm Sunday, December 2

Download the Fall Poster!

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT

What is Treasures from the Yale Film Archive?
Treasures from the Yale Film Archive is an ongoing series of classic and contemporary films in 35mm curated by the Yale Film Study Center and screened at the Whitney Humanities Center.

Treasures screenings are always free and open to the public.

Presented by the Yale Film Study Center and Films at the Whitney with support from Paul L. Joskow '70 M.Phil., '72 Ph.D.

Post on August 16, 2018 - 1:49pm |

Students in HIST 134J, Yale and America, exploring Manuscripts and Archives collection materials in the new Gates classroom.

It has been seven months since our move back into our beautifully renovated public service spaces in the Wall Street wing of Sterling Memorial Library. We’ve had a semester and a summer of Yale students and other researchers back in full force, enjoying the modernized lighting, comfortable and functional furniture, state-of-the-art climate control, and the relative quiet that has resulted from relocating all staff not primarily responsible for public service operations out of the reading room area. The renovation has been deemed an unqualified success by both researchers and staff members!

Students in Prof. Jay Gitlin's Yale and America class exploring Manuscripts and Archives collection materials in the Gates Classroom.

Students in Prof. Jay Gitlin’s Yale and America class exploring Manuscripts and Archives collection materials in the Gates Classroom.

The most spectacular feature of the renovation, both visually and programmatically, is the conversion of the former Grand Exhibition Room at the back of the Manuscripts and Archives reading room into the Gates classroom. The new classroom is named for the late Stephen F. Gates (Class of 1968), whose generosity made the transformation possible. With a new entrance from the back of the Linonia and Brothers (L&B) reading room, the classroom space is separated from the reading room by Samuel Yellin’s dramatically ornate, wrought-iron gates, soundproofed by the insertion of glass in the arches. The Yellin gates bear the phrase There is no past so long as books shall live. This excerpt, from the poem “The Souls of Books” by the 19th century English poet Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Lord Lytton, is a fitting tribute to the room’s original purpose. From the opening of Sterling Memorial Library in 1931 until the move of Yale’s rare book collection to the newly constructed Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library in 1963, the Grand Exhibition Room, in what was then the Rare Book Room, showcased Yale’s copy of the Gutenberg Bible, given to Yale by Mrs. Mary Harkness in 1926 shortly before Sterling Memorial Library opened.

Right-hand gate in Manuscripts and Archives, looking from the reading room into the Gates classroom.

Right-hand gate in Manuscripts and Archives, looking from the reading room into the Gates classroom.

The entire section of Bulwer-Lytton’s poem from which the inscription on the Yellin gates is taken reads (from Dramas and Poems of Edward Bulwer Lytton (Little Brown and Company, 1898), pages 321-325):

IV.

All books grow homilies by time; they are / Temples, at once, and Landmarks. In them, we / Who but for them, upon that inch of ground / We call “The Present,” from the cell could see / No daylight trembling on the dungeon bar; / Turn, as we list, the globe’s great axle round, / Traverse all space, and number every star, / And feel the Near less household than the Far! / There is no Past, so long as Books shall live!A disinterred Pompeii wakes again / For him who seeks yon well; lost cities give / Up their untarnished wonders, and the reign / Of Jove revives and Saturn : — At our will / Rise dome and tower on Delphi’s sacred hill; / Bloom Cimon’s trees in Academe; — along / Leucadia’s headland, sighs the Lesbian’s song; / With AEgypt’s Queen once more we sail the Nile, / And learn how worlds are bartered for a smile; — / Rise up, ye walls, with gardens blooming o’er, / Ope but that page — lo, Babylon once more!

Left-hand gate in Manuscripts and Archives looking from the Gates classroom into the reading room.

Left-hand gate in Manuscripts and Archives looking from the Gates classroom into the reading room.

The Yellin gates and their classics-themed ode to the power of books now watch over Yale students and other researchers, in both the Manuscripts and Archives reading room and the Gates classroom. Researchers and students pour through archival records, primarily, rather than books. These records–documenting the endeavors of Yale, its alumni and faculty, and outside organizations that often have some link to Yale–transport their readers in ways similar to the books in Bulwer-Lytton’s ode. The gist of the poem remains as true as ever..

In the months since the classroom opened we’ve hosted dozens of sessions for Yale classes, visiting high school students from around the globe participating in the Yale Young Global Scholars Program, and students from New Haven schools participating in external and Yale-hosted programs.

Students in Prof. Jay Gitlin's Yale and America class exploring Manuscripts and Archives collection materials in the Gates Classroom.

Students in Prof. Jay Gitlin’s Yale and America class exploring Manuscripts and Archives collection materials in the Gates Classroom.

One Yale course, Professor Jay Gitlin’s history seminar Yale and America, is an extremely popular class whose students plumb the depths of the collections in Manuscripts and Archives to write substantive research papers on topics relating to Yale history. The class session held in the Gates classroom introduced Spring term 2018’s participants to the wide variety of potential sources for their research projects. The Fall 2016 issue of the student-edited, student-produced Yale Historical Review was dedicated to research produced in a class that has become a right of passage for many Yale students from across the disciplines. We’re happy, as we think Stephen F. Gates would be, that Manuscripts and Archives and Sterling Memorial Library now offers a soaring, inspiring space in which a part of that right of passage can occur.

Post on August 10, 2018 - 5:25pm |

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