October 2018 Archives

October 26, 2018

illustration of figures in a cave

Heather O’Donnell '00 Ph.D., founder of Honey & Wax Booksellers  and creator of the Honey & Wax Book Collecting Prize for women under age 30, will deliver the 2018 Adrian Van Sinderen Lecture on Nov. 6 at 4:30 p.m. at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Her topic will be "Scouts, Spies, and Surveyors: The Collectors of the Future."

The annual lecture honors Adrian Van Sinderen, class of 1910, who in 1957 established two annual book collecting prizes for Yale undergraduates. Van Sinderen sought to encourage undergraduates to collect books, build their own libraries, and read for pleasure and education. 
 
Heather O'Donnell grew up in the library stacks and bookstore aisles of suburban Delaware. In 1989, she moved to New York City, where she studied English at Columbia, and held down a series of bookish jobs on the side: working the cash register at the Strand, shelving photobooks in the Avery Library, sifting the slush pile at Grand Street.

While writing her doctoral dissertation in the Yale English department, she worked as a curatorial assistant at the Beinecke Library. From 2001 to 2004, she joined the Princeton Society of Fellows, then left academia to pursue the rare book trade full-time. For seven years, she worked as a bookseller in the New York gallery of Bauman Rare Books, dealing in a wide range of material, from incunabula to modern firsts. In the fall of 2011, she founded Honey & Wax Booksellers in Brooklyn. The Honey & Wax Book Collecting Prize is an annual prize for an outstanding book collection conceived and built by a woman under the age of 30. 

O'Donnell is a member of the Grolier Club, the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA), the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB), and a graduate of the Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar and Rare Book School. She serves on the ABAA Board of Governors, the faculty of the Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar, and the vetting committee of the New York Winter Antiques Show.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

Post on October 26, 2018 - 12:33pm |

October 19, 2018

It's a night of psychological dramas in Through Bergman's Lens: Ingmar Bergman Centenary Film Series. TIME  called Through a Glass Darkly "one of the best and certainly the ripest of Ingmar Bergman's creations," while Michael Wilmington praised Persona as "one of the screen's supreme works and perhaps Ingmar Bergman's finest film." Introduction by Professor David Bromwich. 35mm prints from the Yale Film Archive.

Visit the event page and see the series poster!

Time/Date:
Thursday, Nov. 15
7 p.m. Through a Glass Darkly (1961, 89 mins)
9 p.m. Persona (1966, 83 mins)

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Free and open to the public.

Through Bergman's Lens is presented by the Yale Film Study Center and Films at the Whitney with support from Paul L. Joskow '70 M.Phil., '72 Ph.D.

Sign up for the Yale Film Study Center Mailing List online (in the Libraries category).

Post on October 19, 2018 - 10:14am |

October 18, 2018

Treasures from the Yale Film Archive welcomes director Asishish Avikunthak and cinematographer Basab Mullik for a screening of Katho Upanishad. Adapted from the ancient Sanskrit treatise of the same name, this experimental feature from 2011 centers on a metaphysical dialogue in which Yama (Ram Gopal Bajaj) instructs Nachiketa (Suvrat Joshi) about the path to enlightenment. "There's a languorous quality to his films," Deepanjana Pal wrote of Avikuntahk's work in the Sunday Guardian. "Themes, ideas, and inages wind around creating patterns that are as delicate as smoke signals." 35mm print from the Yale Film Archive.

Visit the event page.

Time/Date:
2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT

What is Treasures from the Yale Film Archive?
Treasures from the Yale Film Archive is an ongoing series of classic and contemporary films in 35mm curated by the Yale Film Study Center and screened at the Whitney Humanities Center.

Treasures screenings are always free and open to the public.

Presented by the Yale Film Study Center and Films at the Whitney with support from Paul L. Joskow '70 M.Phil., '72 Ph.D.

Sign up for the Yale Film Study Center Mailing List online (we're in the Libraries category).

Post on October 18, 2018 - 8:48am |

October 12, 2018

Join us as we explore conspicuous consumption, extreme income inequality, and the power of celebrity through Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette. Kirsten Dunst, Jason Schwartzman, Judy Davis, and Rip Torn star in what Carina Chocano of the Los Angeles Times called "a startlingly original and beautiful pop reverie that comes very close to being transcendent." Featuring the music of New Order, the Cure, Siouxsie and the Banshees, the Strokes, Adam Ant, and more, Marie Antoinette will be introduced by Professor Pierre Saint-Amand. 35mm print from the Yale Film Archive.

Visit the event page!

Time/Date:
2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21

Location:
Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT

What is Treasures from the Yale Film Archive?
Treasures from the Yale Film Archive is an ongoing series of classic and contemporary films in 35mm curated by the Yale Film Study Center and screened at the Whitney Humanities Center.

Treasures screenings are always free and open to the public.

Presented by the Yale Film Study Center and Films at the Whitney with support from Paul L. Joskow '70 M.Phil., '72 Ph.D.

Sign up for the Yale Film Study Center Mailing List online (we're in the Libraries category).

Post on October 12, 2018 - 8:50am |

October 4, 2018

Yale Celebrate Sustainability logo

October 8-12, 2018

See examples of eco-friendly design at the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library. Our temporary display case on the main-level bridge will feature books on fashion, architecture, and packaging. Additional related materials are available for browsing in our New Books area. Stop by and consider how art and saving the planet intersect during this year’s Celebrate Sustainability week!

All Arts Library exhibitions are free and open to the public. During the academic year, the library is open to the public Monday through Thursday 8:30am – 7:00pm and Friday 8:30am – 5:00pm. After 7:00pm on weekdays and all day on weekends, a Yale ID card is required to enter the building. To access exhibits and collections after public hours, please contact art.library@yale.edu to schedule an appointment.

Post on October 3, 2018 - 2:37pm |

One Yale College senior will receive library funding, mentoring, and production support to create and curate a professional-quality exhibit based on senior essay research using materials from a Yale Library archive or collection. The 2019 exhibit will open in mid-April and run through October in Sterling Memorial Library's Wall Street Exhibition Corridor. Exhibit proposals are due by Oct. 22, 2018.

The Senior Exhibit program is one of several Yale University Library initiatives to encourage and showcase student research with materials and primary sources from the libraries' diverse collections.  The student curator is selected by a library committee based on proposal quality and recommendations from faculty and librarian advisors. Preference is given to projects using less well known collections.  

To be considered for the Senior Exhibit opening in April 2019, submit your proposal by Oct. 22, 2018, together with letters of support from a faculty advisor and a librarian exhibit advisor who agree to work with you throughout the project.

The exhibit will be based on the same research as your senior essay or thesis. As a student curator, you will have an opportunity to explore presenting your research in the alternate narrative form of an exhibit -- a form with a strong visual component, a defined physical space, and its own conventions and practices.

Yale University Library's exhibit professionals, under the direction of Exhibit Program Manager Kerri Sancomb, will work closely with the selected student, faculty advisor, and library advisor to plan and mount the exhibit. They will provide production tools, templates, technical expertise, and guidance for the physical production of the exhibit. They also coordinate schedules, deadlines, and management of collections materials. The library will also host an opening reception for the exhibit.

Some academic departments may accept the exhibit as a senior project, or in partial fulfillment of the senior project requirements. Any such arrangement is at the discretion of the academic department. The student curator is responsible for discussing the senior project requirements with the academic department and securing the necessary approvals for use of the exhibit in this way. 

For more information, read the guide for Senior Exhibit Project Applicants and the overviews of student curator responsibilities. Review the exhibit production calendar.

Post on October 1, 2018 - 8:51am |