April 2018 Archives

April 27, 2018

sign for the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale

Join us to hear about the History Keepers Project on Wednesday, May 2 at 5:00 pm in Sterling Memorial Library's International Room, where eleven Yale students will present summaries of their research into the Black experience at Yale – the second year of a collaboration between the Yale Library and the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale.
During this semester, archivists and librarians* from the Yale Library have worked with the Afro-American Cultural Center to introduce Black undergraduate students to history research methodologies, library tools and resources, and careers in academia, libraries, and archives. The research focus of the program has been on researching the Black experience at Yale, with each student being mentored by the archivists and librarians. Please join us in celebrating the program. All are welcome!
 
The History Keepers Program is a collaboration between the Yale Afro-American Cultural Center, the Yale University Library, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture.
 
*Anna Arays, Melissa Barton, Kelly Blanchat, Mike Brenes, Alison Clemens, Gwyneth Crowley, Emily DiLeo, Molly Dotson, Jason Eiseman, Afua Ferdnance, Kenya Flash, Emily Horning, James Kassenides, Mike Lotstein, Gabby Redwine, Rich Richie, Charles Riley, Camila Tessler, Christine Weideman
 
 

Post on April 27, 2018 - 12:51pm |

April 27, 2018

Nota Bene:  Yale Library Annual Report 2016 - 2017

Nota Bene
Winter Annual Report
2016-2017

Post on April 27, 2018 - 12:28pm |

April 19, 2018

Call for Entries poster, The Lohmann & Van Sinderen Prizes for Undergraduate Printing and Design

The Lohmann & Van Sinderen Prizes aim to recognize and celebrate the broad range of interest in planning, craft, and invention that gives undergraduate design and printing at Yale its singular character. The judges are eager to see printed works of all kinds in order to reward skill, discipline, and imagination. 

Eligible pieces must have been planned and executed in the past academic year by a current Yale undergraduate. They may include publications and ephemera, class assignments, and self-initiated printing projects. Professional studio work will not be considered, nor will printmaking projects, per se. Entries can be made by both digital and traditional methods, although final renditions cannot be screen-based. 

For more information, including submission instructions and images of past entries, visit https://lohmann.yale.edu/. Entries must be submitted by 1:30 pm on Friday, April 27, 2018, to Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library Special Collections. 

Prizes of up to $500 will be awarded at an informal ceremony on April 27 at 5 pm on the main level of the Haas Arts Library, where all entries will be on view. 

Note: All winning entries become part of the Yale Residential Colleges Student Printing Collection immediately following the awards ceremony. The Arts Library encourages all entrants to donate their submissions to help build the collection.

Post on April 19, 2018 - 6:07am |

April 19, 2018

Man dressed in traditonal dress

“Black Sound and the Archive”, the current exhibit at the Gilmore Music Library, highlights materials from the library’s Special Collections that document the history and significance of African-American sonic practices. In addition to historic sound recordings, the exhibit features an array of rare and unusual items from the library’s collections, such as an arrangement written by Mary Lou Williams, a document in Duke Ellington’s hand, and objects that belonged to J. Rosamond Johnson, the composer of “Lift Every Voice and Sing.

Among those objects are faded pajamas and a carved wooden cane. “The loungewear here accompanied by cane offers a glimpse of Johnson’s intimate sartorial style, the elegance and fashion ease that he maintained,” writes curator Daphne Brooks in the exhibition notes. “Like his fellow postbellum black theater peers, he valued clothing as a way to ‘redress’ the black body in the struggle for racial equality.”

The exhibit runs April 13-July 30, 2018; however, the pajamas will be on display only through May 21 because of their fragile state.

The Black Sound and the Archive Working Group at Yale University is a two-year initiative supported by Yale’s 320 York Humanities Grant that focuses on the history and significance of African-American sonic practices in tandem with a critical examination of the nature of archives. The group seeks to augment the very notion of what constitutes a black sound archive. Beyond historical sound recordings as such, African-American sonic practices are also embedded in a rich yet often opaque archive of extraordinary and everyday objects, photographs, narratives, performances, and repertoires.

The group is led by Professors Daphne Brooks (African American Studies, American Studies, Theater Studies, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) and Brian Kane (Music), and includes faculty, graduate students, and undergrads from Yale and beyond. This exhibit is one of the multiple workshops, performances and other events produced by the group.

Post on April 19, 2018 - 4:23pm |

April 13, 2018

students standing in front of a bust of Mao

How did China’s Communist revolution transform the nation’s political culture? In this rich and vivid history of the Mao period (1949–1976), Denise Y. Ho examines the relationship between its exhibitions and its political movements. Case studies from Shanghai show how the revolution was curated: museum workers collected cultural and revolutionary relics; neighborhoods, schools, and work units mounted and narrated local displays; and exhibits provided ritual space for ideological lessons and political campaigns. Using archival sources, ephemera, interviews, and other materials, Ho traces the process by which exhibitions were developed, presented, and received. Examples under analysis range from the First Party Congress Site and the Shanghai Museum to the ‘class education’ and Red Guard exhibits that accompanied the Socialist Education Movement and the Cultural Revolution. Operating in two modes - that of a state in power and that of a state in revolution - Mao era exhibitionary culture remains part of China’s revolutionary legacy.

Denise Y. Ho is an historian of modern China, with a particular focus on the social and cultural history of the Mao period (1949-1976). She is also interested in urban history, the study of information and propaganda, and the history of memory. Ho teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on modern and contemporary China, the history of Shanghai, the uses of the past in modern China, and the historiography of the Republican era and the P.R.C. 

Denise Y. Ho received her B.A. in history from Yale College and an A.M. and Ph.D. in history from Harvard University.

The Book Talk takes place on April 19th in the International Room at Sterling Memorial Library at 4:30pm. Coffee and cookies will be provided before the talk at 4:00pm.

Post on April 13, 2018 - 2:41pm |

April 11, 2018

Professor Ho's new book: Curating Revolution: Politics on Display in Mao's China

How did China’s Communist revolution transform the nation’s political culture? In this rich and vivid history of the Mao period (1949–1976), Denise Y. Ho examines the relationship between its exhibitions and its political movements. Case studies from Shanghai show how the revolution was curated: museum workers collected cultural and revolutionary relics; neighborhoods, schools, and work units mounted and narrated local displays; and exhibits provided ritual space for ideological lessons and political campaigns. Using archival sources, ephemera, interviews, and other materials, Ho traces the process by which exhibitions were developed, presented, and received. Examples under analysis range from the First Party Congress Site and the Shanghai Museum to the ‘class education’ and Red Guard exhibits that accompanied the Socialist Education Movement and the Cultural Revolution. Operating in two modes - that of a state in power and that of a state in revolution - Mao era exhibitionary culture remains part of China’s revolutionary legacy.

Denise Y. Ho is a historian of modern China, with a particular focus on the social and cultural history of the Mao period (1949-1976). She is also interested in urban history, the study of information and propaganda, and the history of memory. Ho teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on modern and contemporary China, the history of Shanghai, the uses of the past in modern China, and the historiography of the Republican era and the P.R.C. 

Denise Y. Ho received her B.A. in history from Yale College and an A.M. and Ph.D. in history from Harvard University.

The Book Talk takes place on April 19th in the International Room at Sterling Memorial Library at 4:30pm. Coffee and cookies will be provided before the talk at 4:00pm.

Post on April 11, 2018 - 9:12am |

April 10, 2018

Man dressed in tradition dress

In conjunction with the opening of a new exhibit at Gilmore Music Library, students from the Black Sound and the Archive working group will give "lightning talks" and present their online sound archives for viewing and listening. The presentations are April 13, 10 a.m.-noon. in the Center for Teaching and Learning rooms facing the Music Library entrance. The Black Sound and the Archive Exhibition is in the exhibit cases outside the entrance and will run from April 13-July 30.

Related events with jazz pianist, composer, educator Jason Moran on Thursday, April 12. 

Black Sound and the Archive Working Group at Yale University is a two-year initiative supported by Yale’s 320 York Humanities Grant that focuses on the history and significance of African-American sonic practices in tandem with a critical examination of the nature of archives. The group seeks to augment the very notion of what constitutes a black sound archive. Beyond historical sound recordings as such, African-American sonic practices are also embedded in a rich yet often opaque archive of extraordinary and everyday objects, photographs, narratives, performances, and repertoires. The group is led by Professor Daphne Brooks (African American Studies, American Studies, Theater Studies, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) and Professor Brian Kane (Music), and includes faculty, graduate students, and undergrads from Yale and beyond. It produces a variety of events, including workshops, performances, and exhibits.

Post on April 10, 2018 - 11:41am |

April 9, 2018

[Detail of slipcase textile], Negative Entropy (2015) by Mika Tajima. Image copyright Mika Tajima. Used with permission.

April 9–September 7, 2018

Text and textile are linked far beyond their shared linguistic origin in the Latin verb texere, meaning to weave. Both are situated at intersections of the material and the cultural. Craft, content, and context determine their use values and multiple meanings over time. A multitude of technologies and techniques of the hand and the machine give structure to words as well as fibers. Such verbal and visual transformations may appear on the surface of the thing itself or lie beneath the assembly of interlocking, overlapping, or contrasting elements.

This selection of materials held by the Haas Arts Library Special Collections ranges from a late 18th-century recipe for blue dye to a flipbook rendition of Scheherazade’s nightly storytelling routine. Some works incorporate various methods of textile practice. Others draw parallels through language, pattern, or material. This exhibition is a companion to the Beinecke Library’s Text and Textile exhibition on view from May 3 to August 12.  

All Arts Library exhibitions are free and open to the public. During the academic year, the library is open to the public Monday through Thursday 8:30am–7:00pm and Friday 8:30am–5:00pm. After 7:00pm on weekdays and all day on weekends, a Yale ID card is required to enter the building. To access exhibits and collections after public hours, please contact art.library@yale.edu to schedule an appointment.

Curator: Molly E. Dotson

Image copyright Mika Tajima. Used with permission.

Post on April 9, 2018 - 3:35pm |

April 9, 2018

Poster for screening of "Jane Davis Doggett: Wayfinder in the Jet Age"

If you enter an airport today, you will almost certainly see the design concepts of Jane Davis Doggett ’56 MFA in action. Doggett attended what was then called the Yale School of Architecture and Design in its modernist heyday, studying with the likes of Josef Albers, Louis Kahn, and Alvin Eisenman. She brought the Bauhaus mentality which then prevailed at the School into her own emerging career, unifying art, architecture, and graphic design to create wayfinding systems that would help people to move through large spaces at scale. Beginning in 1959, she used newly built airports as her laboratory for experimenting in design theory, ultimately designing graphic systems for more than 40 airports as well as Madison Square Garden, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Philadelphia subway system. 

Please join us for a screening of a new 30-minute documentary by Pat Williams, on her remarkable career and life, Jane Davis Doggett: Wayfinder in the Jet Age, followed by a Q&A with Ms. Doggett herself.  The event is on Tuesday, April 10, at 5:30-6:30pm in the International Room at Sterling Memorial Library.

Post on April 9, 2018 - 4:21pm |

March 21, 2017

CLASS PICTURES: STUDENT ARCHIVIST SCREENING NIGHT includes 16mm rarities presented by students in Film 604: The Film Archive, with introductions by Brian Meacham and students from the class. 7:00pm Tuesday, May 1, at the Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street in New Haven. "Treasures" screenings are always free and open to everyone. Learn more.

Post on April 8, 2018 - 8:00pm |

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