April 2018 Archives

April 4, 2018

Yale graduates preparing for commencement

Attention Seniors! Win recognition, honor, and a  $500 cash prize for an essay based on your original research. The Yale University Library offers four senior essay prizes, each with an award of $500. 
 

The Manuscripts & Archives (MSSA) Kaplan Prize for Yale History is awarded in memory of MSSA Archivist Diane E. Kaplan for an outstanding senior essay on a topic related to Yale.The prize is presented at the student's residential college commencement ceremony. Submission deadline is Friday, April 20, at 5 p.m. EDT. For essay guidelines and to submit your essay: https://guides.library.yale.edu/MSSAPrize
 

A second MSSA Kaplan Senior Essay Prize is awarded for an outstanding senior essay on any topic based on research conducted in MSSA. The prize is presented at the student's residential college commencement ceremony. Submission deadline is Friday, April 20, at 5 p.m. EDT. For essay guidelines and to submit your essay: https://guides.library.yale.edu/MSSAPrize
 

The Harvey M. Applebaum ’59 Award recognizes an outstanding senior essay that makes use of government/IGO information from Yale’s collections (U.S., Canada, United Nations, EU, or Food & Agriculture Organization). For more information and to submit your essay: http://guides.library.yale.edu/Applebaum. Submission deadline is Wednesday, April 26 at 11:59 p.m.
 

The Library Map Prize is awarded to a Yale College senior for the best use of maps in a senior essay or its equivalent.  For more information and to submit your essay: http://guides.library.yale.edu/MapPrizeSubmission deadline is Wednesday, April 26 at 11:59 p.m.

Post on April 4, 2018 - 11:52am |

April 10, 2018

Man dressed in tradition dress

In conjunction with the opening of a new exhibit at Gilmore Music Library, students from the Black Sound and the Archive working group will give "lightning talks" and present their online sound archives for viewing and listening. The presentations are April 13, 10 a.m.-noon. in the Center for Teaching and Learning rooms facing the Music Library entrance. The Black Sound and the Archive Exhibition is in the exhibit cases outside the entrance and will run from April 13-July 30.

Related events with jazz pianist, composer, educator Jason Moran on Thursday, April 12. 

Black Sound and the Archive Working Group at Yale University is a two-year initiative supported by Yale’s 320 York Humanities Grant that focuses on the history and significance of African-American sonic practices in tandem with a critical examination of the nature of archives. The group seeks to augment the very notion of what constitutes a black sound archive. Beyond historical sound recordings as such, African-American sonic practices are also embedded in a rich yet often opaque archive of extraordinary and everyday objects, photographs, narratives, performances, and repertoires. The group is led by Professor Daphne Brooks (African American Studies, American Studies, Theater Studies, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) and Professor Brian Kane (Music), and includes faculty, graduate students, and undergrads from Yale and beyond. It produces a variety of events, including workshops, performances, and exhibits.

Post on April 10, 2018 - 11:41am |

April 13, 2018

students standing in front of a bust of Mao

How did China’s Communist revolution transform the nation’s political culture? In this rich and vivid history of the Mao period (1949–1976), Denise Y. Ho examines the relationship between its exhibitions and its political movements. Case studies from Shanghai show how the revolution was curated: museum workers collected cultural and revolutionary relics; neighborhoods, schools, and work units mounted and narrated local displays; and exhibits provided ritual space for ideological lessons and political campaigns. Using archival sources, ephemera, interviews, and other materials, Ho traces the process by which exhibitions were developed, presented, and received. Examples under analysis range from the First Party Congress Site and the Shanghai Museum to the ‘class education’ and Red Guard exhibits that accompanied the Socialist Education Movement and the Cultural Revolution. Operating in two modes - that of a state in power and that of a state in revolution - Mao era exhibitionary culture remains part of China’s revolutionary legacy.

Denise Y. Ho is an historian of modern China, with a particular focus on the social and cultural history of the Mao period (1949-1976). She is also interested in urban history, the study of information and propaganda, and the history of memory. Ho teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on modern and contemporary China, the history of Shanghai, the uses of the past in modern China, and the historiography of the Republican era and the P.R.C. 

Denise Y. Ho received her B.A. in history from Yale College and an A.M. and Ph.D. in history from Harvard University.

The Book Talk takes place on April 19th in the International Room at Sterling Memorial Library at 4:30pm. Coffee and cookies will be provided before the talk at 4:00pm.

Post on April 13, 2018 - 2:41pm |

April 19, 2018

Man dressed in traditonal dress

“Black Sound and the Archive”, the current exhibit at the Gilmore Music Library, highlights materials from the library’s Special Collections that document the history and significance of African-American sonic practices. In addition to historic sound recordings, the exhibit features an array of rare and unusual items from the library’s collections, such as an arrangement written by Mary Lou Williams, a document in Duke Ellington’s hand, and objects that belonged to J. Rosamond Johnson, the composer of “Lift Every Voice and Sing.

Among those objects are faded pajamas and a carved wooden cane. “The loungewear here accompanied by cane offers a glimpse of Johnson’s intimate sartorial style, the elegance and fashion ease that he maintained,” writes curator Daphne Brooks in the exhibition notes. “Like his fellow postbellum black theater peers, he valued clothing as a way to ‘redress’ the black body in the struggle for racial equality.”

The exhibit runs April 13-July 30, 2018; however, the pajamas will be on display only through May 21 because of their fragile state.

The Black Sound and the Archive Working Group at Yale University is a two-year initiative supported by Yale’s 320 York Humanities Grant that focuses on the history and significance of African-American sonic practices in tandem with a critical examination of the nature of archives. The group seeks to augment the very notion of what constitutes a black sound archive. Beyond historical sound recordings as such, African-American sonic practices are also embedded in a rich yet often opaque archive of extraordinary and everyday objects, photographs, narratives, performances, and repertoires.

The group is led by Professors Daphne Brooks (African American Studies, American Studies, Theater Studies, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) and Brian Kane (Music), and includes faculty, graduate students, and undergrads from Yale and beyond. This exhibit is one of the multiple workshops, performances and other events produced by the group.

Post on April 19, 2018 - 4:23pm |

April 27, 2018

sign for the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale

Join us to hear about the History Keepers Project on Wednesday, May 2 at 5:00 pm in Sterling Memorial Library's International Room, where eleven Yale students will present summaries of their research into the Black experience at Yale – the second year of a collaboration between the Yale Library and the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale.
During this semester, archivists and librarians* from the Yale Library have worked with the Afro-American Cultural Center to introduce Black undergraduate students to history research methodologies, library tools and resources, and careers in academia, libraries, and archives. The research focus of the program has been on researching the Black experience at Yale, with each student being mentored by the archivists and librarians. Please join us in celebrating the program. All are welcome!
 
The History Keepers Program is a collaboration between the Yale Afro-American Cultural Center, the Yale University Library, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture.
 
*Anna Arays, Melissa Barton, Kelly Blanchat, Mike Brenes, Alison Clemens, Gwyneth Crowley, Emily DiLeo, Molly Dotson, Jason Eiseman, Afua Ferdnance, Kenya Flash, Emily Horning, James Kassenides, Mike Lotstein, Gabby Redwine, Rich Richie, Charles Riley, Camila Tessler, Christine Weideman
 
 

Post on April 27, 2018 - 12:51pm |